Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Gluten Intolerance from Lack of Vitamin C and Probiotics: Dr. Mayer Eisenstein on Study Pointing to Strong Correlation

Gluten Intolerance from Lack of Vitamin C and Probiotics: Dr. Mayer Eisenstein on Study Pointing to Strong Correlation
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Gluten Intolerance from Lack of Vitamin C and Probiotics: Dr. Mayer Eisenstein on Study Pointing to Strong Correlation
Los Angeles , CA
Wednesday, June 25, 2014
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Dr. Mayer Eisenstein, co-host of Know Your Rights Radio Show with Vaccine Rights Attorney Alan Phillips, and author of Make an Informed Vaccine Decision for the Health of Your Child: A Parent's Guide to Childhood Shots, has begun to cite a study that draws a strong parallel between severe gluten intolerance, called Celiac disease, to insufficient levels of Vitamin C and Probiotics. In a video distributed through his newsletter and posted on various websites, he discusses a study published in the Journal of Allergologia et Immunopathologia that noted that biopsies taken from patients with celiac disease were dramatically altered by the addition of "some ascorbate (vitamin C) to lab dishes containing gut tissue. The various inflammatory markers (INF-a & y, TNF, IL-13, 16, 17) were abolished in the vitamin C-treated dishes!"
The study seems to point a startling conclusion that "Mankind is suffering from yet another manifestation of Vitamin C deficiency." Dr. Eisenstein has been championing the use of large amounts of Vitamin D over the last few years, calling it a "miracle vitamin," and now his stance on the use other Vitamins and natural supplements is getting a leg up from this study. A long-time opponent of mass vaccinations and highly suspicious of drug company claims, Dr. Eisenstein become more convinced every day that his stance on natural supplements is correct and he recommends them to his patients at the various health clinics he runs in Illinois and Florida
In the study, run by Dr. Anurag Singh, 20 people with seasonal allergic rhinitis were brought in to participate in a double-blinded, parallel, randomized placebo-controlled trial. Subjects randomly were given B. lactis NCC2818 (Probiotic) or a placebo for eight weeks. Probiotic groups exhibited fewer allergic responses the "probiotic group compared with the placebo group" as researches also looked at "the activation levels of white blood cells that play a role in inflammatory reactions called basophils." Using the levels of basophils to diagnose allergies is an effective tool and was used in this study as it "revealed that activation of CD63 basophils was lower in the probiotic group after one month of supplementation."
Dr. Eisenstein was not surprised to read that, by altering one's diet to include "probiotics and/or prebiotics (found in some foods) and in supplements may help alleviate the severity of celiac/gluten sensitivity for some patients." The May 2010 Journal of Leukocyte Biology stated that "differing intestinal bacteria in celiac patients could influence inflammation to varying degrees." Bottom line is that celiac patients can make huge strides in holding the deleterious effects of their gluten intolerance by a strategy of probiotic, prebiotics and Vitamin C. The study indicated these recommendations can be extended "patients with associated diseases such as type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune disorders."
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Mayer Eisenstein, Ph.D., JD
Los Angeles, CA
310-902-8935
 
 
 
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